BY SPNW Staff 07:12PM 01/09/2012

Huskies Home For Annual Battle With Seattle U.

After a 1-1 Pac-12 road trip to Colorado and Utah, Washington returns to Alaska Airlines Arena this week for matchups with Seattle University and Washington State.

Former University of Washington assistant Cameron Dollar is off to a slow start with his Seattle U. Redhawks. / Drew Sellers, Sportspress Northwest

GAME: Seattle University (3-10) at Washington (9-6, 3-1 Pac-12). WHEN: Tuesday, 7 p.m., Alaska Airlines Arena. MEETING: 27th (Huskies lead 22-4). RANKINGS: Neither team ranked. TV: ROOT Sports. RADIO: KJR 950 AM, 102.9 FM.

Unless Washington reaches the NCAA Tournament — odds at this juncture are long — the Huskies will play their final non-conference game of the season Tuesday when they host Seattle University, which has lost all three games since the intra-city rivalry was renewed.

Now in their third season as a Division I program under former Washington assistant Cameron Dollar, the Redhawks won 17 games two years ago, 11 last season and three so far this season. Seattle U.’s biggest win was Nov. 22 over Montana State 80-73 at Bozeman. Seattle U. has dropped two straight, to San Jose State and Utah Valley.

Seattle U. has played one Pac-12 team this season, losing 72-49 Dec. 1 to Stanford at KeyArena.

Seattle U. features three double-figure scorers in 6-5 senior forward Aaron Broussard (17.2), 6-6 redshirt sophomore forward Clarence Trent (11.5) and 6-7 senior forward Eric Wallace (10.1).

Broussard, who helped lead Federal Way High School to its first state championship in 2008, scored a career-high 31 points and had 11 rebounds Dec. 29 against Nebraska Omaha.

A Tacoma native, Trent transferred to Seattle U. from Washington, for which he appeared in 23 games in 2009-10. On Jan. 26, 2010, Trent scored five points against the Redhawks in Washington’s 123-76 win.

Lorenzo Romar’s Huskies completed their first Pac-12 road trip Saturday, escaping Utah with a 57-53 victory, which snapped a five-game road losing streak. The Huskies have not lost to Seattle U. since the Redhawks’ return to Division I (2009).

SERIES: Dates to March 15, 1953, when Washington, behind Bob Houbregs’ 45 points, won 92-70 in the first round of the NCAA Tournament in Portland. The Huskies have posted six consecutive victories over the Redhawks, who have not defeated UW since 1979. After Seattle U. ceded its Division I status in 1980, the schools did not meet again until 2009, when the Redhawks rejoined Division I. The most recent meeting was Feb. 22, 2011, when the Huskies won 95-74.  Matthew Bryan-Amaning scored 24 points and pulled down 13 rebounds. Current Husky Aziz N’Diaye had a career-best 15 points and 10 rebounds.

LAST GAME (Washington, Jan. 7): Terrence Ross connected on a crucial 3-pointer with two minutes to play and made two free throws with 8.9 seconds to play, lifting Washington to its first road win of the season, 57-53  over Utah at Salt Lake City. The Huskies won the slow-paced game despite scoring 23 under their season average and missing six free throws down the stretch. Ross led UW with 14 points, the only Husky in double figures. Team scoring leader Tony Wroten tallied just eight. Utah native C.J. Wilcox went 2-for-13 from the floor and finished with five. Desmond Simmons had 10 rebounds and six points in 28 minutes off the bench.

LAST GAME (Seattle U., Jan. 7): Seattle U. rallied from a double-digit deficit to take the lead in the second half, but Utah Valley made just enough plays down the stretch to pull out a 77-72 victory in Orem, UT. Redhawk C Eric Wallace went 9-for-12 and scored 18 points to go with eight rebounds, while Aaron Broussard notched his second double-double of the season with 15 points, 12 in the second half, and 11 rebounds. Cervante Burrell made his first start of the season and contributed nine points, three rebounds, and five assists.

UW STATS/NOTES: The Huskies added to their roster Monday freshman Austin Sefarian-Jenkins, a 6-foot-6, 258-pound tight end from the football team. He last played for Gig Harbor High School, where he averaged 19 points and eight rebounds as a senior. Romar said he will not play against SU, but left open the possibility of playing Sunday against Washington State . . . Romar said redshirt freshman forward Simmons could “eventually” make the starting lineup, but answered “we’ll see” as to whether Simmons would start against SU . . . After scoring just 57 points against Utah Saturday, the Huskies are averaging 78.3 ppg while allowing 72.0 . . . Averaging more than eight 3-pointers per game through mid-December, UW is now averaging 6.8 and allowing 6.6 . . . UW makes just 62.8 percent of its free throws, on pace to become the third-worst mark in the past two decades (the 2001 Huskies made 57.5 percent) . . . Leading scorer Tony Wroten (16.5) is the only UW starter making more than 50 percent of his shots (50.5), and also the only Husky starter making only half of his free throws (51.5).

SEATTLE U. STATS/NOTES: Despite a 3-10 record, Seattle U. has only been outscored 968-912 in 13 games . . . Seattle U. averages 70.2 points per game and allows 74.5 . . . The Redhawks are poor 3-point shooters, making just 29.2 percent, but are much better free throw shooters than the Huskies, hitting 72 percent . . . Seattle U. outrebounds its opponents, 39.6 to 37.2 . . . Seattle U. makes an extraordinary number of turnovers per game, 15.2.

COACHES: Romar is in his 10th season as Washington’s head coach. His Huskies have won 166 games since 2004-05 (entering the 2011-12 season), most in any seven-year span in school history. Romar signed a 10-year contract extension last April. He won his 200th game at Washington Dec. 16 when the Huskies defeated UC Santa Barbara.

Cameron Dollar: The former University of Washington assistant Cameron is in his third season as head coach. Last year SU had 11 wins, including a second straight victory over Oregon State and a road victory at ACC school Virginia. Dollar led SU to a 17-14 record in 2009-10, making the Redhawks the first team to post a winning record playing a full Division I schedule in its first year. Dollar served seven years under Romar.

Art Thiel

ART THIEL’S TAKE: The buzz around the rivalry game is more about Sefarian-Jenkins’ arrival than anything intra-city. But Romar said he wouldn’t see action, although the anticipated blow-out will push the Dawg Pack to insist that AS-J join the fray.

Romar insisted that SU was the “best 3-10 team in American,” which may have been more of a lifeline to his pal Dollar than a serious statement of worth. Nevertheless, little that the Huskies didn’t on the road trip to Colorado and Utah suggested that they can be arrogant about anyone who steps on the floor against them. Don’t be surprised to see Simmons, the most intense worker on the team that Romar likened to former start Bobby Jones,  start ahead of Darnell Gant.  Washington 96, Seattle U. 76.


Steve Rudman

STEVE RUDMAN’S TAKE: Dollar is finding out just how laborious a chore it is to turn a long-time Division III program into a consistently good one at the Division I level. The Redhawks have just three wins this season, even struggling against lower-tier teams outfits such as Utah Valley.

Even with former Husky recruit Trent, who transferred, Seattle U. does not have the athletes to match up success Washington, even a wildly inconsistent Washington, especially at Alaska Airlines Arena. The Huskies could score 100 or more in this one, and I expect Romar to use nearly all of his roster. Washington 102, Seattle U. 75.

COMING UP: The Huskies host Washington Stateat 4 p.m. Sunday, then play the Bay Area schools, California (Jan. 19) and Stanford (Jan. 21) at homeAlaska  before closing out January with road games at Arizona State (Jan. 26) and Arizona (Jan. 28).

University of Washington 2011-12 Schedule/Results

(Rankings Are Current)

Date Opponent UW Rnk Opp Rnk W/L Score Rec.
11/4/11 vs. Seattle Pacific W 77-60 0-0
11/12/11 vs. Georgia State W 91-74 1-0
11/13/11 vs. Florida Atlantic W 77-71 2-0
11/14/11 vs. Portland W 93-63 3-0
11/20/11 at Saint Louis L 77-64 3-1
11/25/11 vs. Houston Baptist W 88-65 4-1
12/2/11 at Nevada L 76-73 (OT) 4-2
12/6/11 vs. Marquette 20 L 79-77 4-3
12/10/11 vs. Duke 5 L 86-80 4-4
12/16/11 vs. UC Santa-Barbara W 87-80 5-4
12/18/11 vs. South Dakota St. L 92-73 5-5
12/22/11 vs. Cal-State Northridge W 74-50 6-5
12/29/11 vs. Oregon State W 95-80 7-5
12/31/11 vs. Oregon W 76-60 8-5
1/5/12 at Colorado L 87-69 8-6
1/7/12 at Utah W 57-53 9-6
1/10/12 vs. Seattle U.
1/15/12 vs. Washington St.
1/19/12 vs. California
1/21/12 vs. Stanford
1/26/12 at Arizona St.
1/28/12 at Arizona
2/2/12 vs. UCLA
2/4/12 vs. USC
2/9/12 at Oregon
2/12/12 at Oregon St.
2/16/12 vs. Arizona State
2/18/12 vs. Arizona
2/25/12 at Washington St.
3/1/12 at USC
3/3/12 at UCLA
3/7/12 Pac-12 Tournament
3/8/12 Pac-12 Tournament
3/9/12 Pac-12 Tournament
3/10/12 Pac-12 Tournament



YourThoughts

  • CompassRosy

    “As to Edgar’s almost-exclusive role as a DH, I’d argue that every American League team has had to fill that position every day for nearly four decades, and no one filled it better than Martinez” …. hence why each year the most outstanding DH is awarded the EDGAR MARTINEZ AWARD :-) 

  • Soggyblogger

    In regards to the Safeco Field Theorem: Why isn’t this a fixable problem? Cannot a fence be erected moving the fence closer to home plate? Is that illegal? Unethical? What? Sorry I am so ignorant. 

    • Pixeldawg13

      Soggy, yes the fences could be moved in.  Then you’d have a pitcher’s park with close fences.  The cool marine air won’t change.

      I tend to like Radio Guy’s scenario #3–which would be helped by moving the fences out a bit.

      • Angus Podgorny

        People need to quit using St. Louis and Kansas City of twenty years ago as examples of how teams with no power win.  Baseball has changed and nobody wins with just pitching, defense, and speed these days.  It just isn’t done anymore, and other than the two examples cited, it has rarely been done.

      • One174

        If the cool marine air causes flies to die short of the fence, why wouldn’t moving the fence in make more of the flies into homers?

  • scot04

    Ownership should have stepped up & said we’ll be responsible for Ichiro’s contract.
    Make it separate from payroll and tell “Z” there’s 19M more to spend; Go get Fielder.
    We all know ownership is going to want to resign Ichiro this way they could do so without tying managements hands.
    Still if we knew we would trade Pineda for a power bat & young good hitting catcher we should have
    obviously called the Reds. Gives us the DH, Catcher & starting pitcher + a minor league reliever.4
    for 1 one plus Alonzo’s left handed bat is a better fit. Not to mention a
    better defensive catcher who might not have as much power but also hit well in the
    minors.  Either way I cannot see why M’s did not just say Pineda only and stick to it.  (Yes Z wanted a RH power bat, but still.)
    We definately gave the Yankees a no lose proposition.

  • Bert

    That’s pretty fatalistic, Art. Do you have an abundance of examples that demonstrates the Yankees superior knowledge and capacity to divine the future of young ball payers?
    This trade may work out for the M’s, or not. Pineda has had arm troubles already, and that can derail any pitcher’s career at any time. Over at the Times, Larry Stone is comparimg this to the trade that brought Roberto Alomar and Joe Carter to Toronto in exchange for Tony Fern Fernandez and Fred McGriff – a trade about filling holes, not about salaries. This could very well be a trade that makes everybody come out looking good.

  • We’re doomed

    I’m mostly with you on the Safeco Theorem, except that other teams seem to not have trouble hitting home runs here. This column is dead-on, the only problem with it being that now I wonder why I care at all. I was stoked about the deal but this brought me careening back to Earth. When do we get that NHL team again? *sigh*

  • Anonymous

    Three things:

    1. I hate to see Pineda go (no explanation needed), but you have to give something to get something, and what the M’s got is a 22-year-old rated the #3 prospect in Baseball America last year.  Yes, the Yankees WERE willing to trade Montero, but they had to give something, too.  I’ll wait until the end of the season to weigh in whether it was a good deal or not for the M’s.

    2. The only reason FIelder would sign with Seattle is for the money.  Period.  It wouldn’t be for those night home games during the balmy months of April and May, nor for the would-be homers that die at the warning track because of the cool marine air from Elliott Bay nor for all those walks he’d get because other teams would rather pitch aorund him to get to the rest of the Mariners order.  That’s not a recipe for success.  And, by the way, why are so many other big spenders passing on bidding for Fielder.  What do they know?

    3.  Maybe the organization should be building a team that fits its ballpark instead of trying to fit square pegs into round holes.  Sure, you always want more power, but I think of the great teams Whitey Herzog had in KC and St. Louis (neither of which had hitters parks):  His Royals and Cardinals were built around pitching, defense and speed-speed-speed, and they both were able to compete and win pennants even though neither had true home run threats.  Of course, it helped to have a Whitey Herzog to manage these team and Eric Wedge is no Whitey Herzog.

    In the end, we’ll all have to stop hyperventilating and just wait and see.  Pitching is not the problem in Seattle, hitting is, and bringing in a potential .300/30/100 guy like Montero can only help, even at the cost of a great arm like Pineda’s.

  • Anonymous

    Three things:

    1. I hate to see Pineda go (no explanation needed), but you have to give something to get something, and what the M’s got is a 22-year-old rated the #3 prospect in Baseball America last year.  Yes, the Yankees WERE willing to trade Montero, but they had to give something, too.  I’ll wait until the end of the season to weigh in whether it was a good deal or not for the M’s.

    2. The only reason FIelder would sign with Seattle is for the money.  Period.  It wouldn’t be for those night home games during the balmy months of April and May, nor for the would-be homers that die at the warning track because of the cool marine air from Elliott Bay nor for all those walks he’d get because other teams would rather pitch aorund him to get to the rest of the Mariners order.  That’s not a recipe for success.  And, by the way, why are so many other big spenders passing on bidding for Fielder.  What do they know?

    3.  Maybe the organization should be building a team that fits its ballpark instead of trying to fit square pegs into round holes.  Sure, you always want more power, but I think of the great teams Whitey Herzog had in KC and St. Louis (neither of which had hitters parks):  His Royals and Cardinals were built around pitching, defense and speed-speed-speed, and they both were able to compete and win pennants even though neither had true home run threats.  Of course, it helped to have a Whitey Herzog to manage these team and Eric Wedge is no Whitey Herzog.

    In the end, we’ll all have to stop hyperventilating and just wait and see.  Pitching is not the problem in Seattle, hitting is, and bringing in a potential .300/30/100 guy like Montero can only help, even at the cost of a great arm like Pineda’s.

  • Anonymous

    Hopefully we have gotten an everyday player who will be valuable sooner than later. Pineda is a huge talent and it’s sad to see him go.

    As to the sorry state of the M’s, until the common threads of their last 10 years are gone, Lincoln and Armstrong, it’s not worth buying tickets.

  • http://twitter.com/andrew_lupton Andrew L

    Because attendance would be uneven depending on match up? The NBA should not be welcomed back without concessions, and if that’s the prerequisite for a SB then thanks, but no thanks.

  • RadioGuy

    “Guest” is right:  MLS is not top-rank soccer, but it’s NECESSARY soccer because it gives domestic talent experience and a chance to improve their game.  It definitely has its place.

    Still, I’m glad the Sounders understand the “big picture” of their sport.  Yes, it’s nice beating teams like the Columbus Crew and Real Salt Lake, but teams don’t really earn a reputation beyond their own borders until they start beating teams from beyond those borders.  The CCL is a step in that direction, including this series with Santos Laguna, who’ve been quite successful in Mexico’s Premier Division in recent years.  This IS a big game.

  • SUDS

    “…away goals count double in CCL play…”

    Soccer/football never ceases to baffle me.

  • RadioGuy

    No worse than having an All-Star Game determine who gets the seventh game in the World Series or the NHL’s points system regarding overtime wins and losses.

    Fortunately, this one doesn’t count in MLS (although it had to leave an impression elsewhere), but I’m a little concerned over those six goals allowed. Some of those Santos goals came off total defensive breakdowns in front of the Seattle goal. That is not a good thing. The competition will get easier once MLS gets going, but the Sounders HAVE to tighten it up.