BY Steve Rudman 04:29PM 03/28/2011

Numbers Crunch

Zeitgeist’s got numbers — good, bad, amusing, intriguing — that take the pulse of the Seattle sports scene.


    March 27-April 2, 2011

  • 7
    Number of errors for Oakland defense in the first 19 innings of the season against Seattle. That’s the most in the majors, needless to say.
    (John Hickey)
  • 23
    Number of years since A Major League starting pitcher threw a complete game with no strikeouts on opening day as Felix Hernandez did Friday. Before that, it was Rick Rhoden in 1988.
    (John Hickey)
  • 50
    Percent by which vasectomies spike during March Madness, according to urologist Stephen Jones of the Cleveland Clinic. Jones says that men “need at least a day with ice, keeping the area cool . . . Nothing makes guys want to be in front of a television more than March Madness.” (Deidre Silva)
  • 4
    Number of hits needed by Ichiro Suzuki starting the season to become the Mariners all-time Seattle hits leader. (John Hickey)
  • 7
    Number of times the Mariners have contested the Oakland A’s in an Opening Day game. The Mariners are 4-3 all time against the A’s in these contests, 1-3 in Oakland, 3-0 in Seattle. (Steve Rudman)
  • 4
    Number of Opening Day starts for Felix Hernandez as a Mariner, counting Friday’s in Oakland. Two have been in Seattle and the others have been in the Oakland Coliseum in 2010 and now in 2011. Last year he got no decision (big surprise, right?) by giving up three runs in 6.2 innings. The Mariners won the game anyway. (John Hickey)
  • 10
    Hitting streak that first baseman Justin Smoak carries into the season opener at Oakland. Smoak finished the 2010 season by hitting in his final 10 games. In those contests, Smoak hit .441 (15×34) (Steve Rudman).
  • 7
    Number of players who have been drafted by NBA teams since Lorenzo Romar took over as head coach in 2002, assuming Isaiah Thomas is selected. The list includes Nate Robinson, 2005, first round), Brandon Roy (2006, first round), Bobby Jones (2006, second round), Spencer Hawes (2007, first round), Jon Brockman (2009, second round) and Quincy Pondexter (2010, first round). (Steve Rudman)
  • 6
    Isaiah Thomas’s rank on the University of Washington’s career scoring list, 1,721 points. Thomas, announcing he will declare for the NBA Draft, also finishes ranked third in assists (415), third in 3-pointers made (164) and eighth in steals (122). (Steve Rudman)
  • 95.0
    Completion percentage for Jake Locker in his Pro Day workout for NFL scouts, after he completed 38 of his 40 passes. It is the highest completion percentage of any potential 2011 draftee, ahead of Nevada’s Colin Kaepernick (94.7), TCU’s Andy Dalton (94.2), Missouri’s Blaine Gabbert (89.8), and Auburn’s Cam Newton (83.3). Sam Bradford, the No. 1 overall pick in 2010, completed 49 of 50 in his Pro Day workout, 98.0 percent (Doug Farrar).
  • 11
    Number of wins in their Peoria Stadium home by the Mariners in Cactus League play this spring. That’s the second-best home win total for Seattle in Peoria, only after the 13 wins posted in 1994. (John Hickey)
  • 26
    Number of shots on goal Sounders took against Houston Dynamo — a new record that yielded only one goal. (Stanley Holmes)
  • 0.00
    ERA this spring for RHP Jamey Wright, who threw 12 innings in 11 games without allowing an earned run in the Cactus League. (John Hickey).
  • 1
    Washington football player, Austin Seferian-Jenkins, who will enroll early from high school for spring football. (Todd Dybas).
  • 4
    Number of positions that Adam Kennedy, added to the Mariners’ 40-man roster on Monday, has played during spring game — first base, second base, third base and left field. Unfortunately for the Mariners, he’s hitting just .214 in 16 games (Steve Rudman).
  • 31
    Number of players remaining in Seattle’s Major League camp after a flurry of transactions Monday. The club must reduce to 25 players by Opening day on April 1 (Steve Rudman).
  • Zeitgeist is published continuously throughout each week and is updated frequently. A new Zeitgeist appears every Sunday afternoon. You can access Zeitgeist archives by clicking here.


YourThoughts

  • jafabian

    What makes Lou’s tenure even more impressive is that he managed in two different home fields, both as different to one another as they come.  He was able to adjust to Safeco after being in the hitting friendly confines of the Kingdome.  So I guess the question is does the current club play to Safeco Field’s strength’s?  I don’t see them execute the small ball gameplan too often.

    Looking at this list the teams are pretty evenly divided between the Kingdome and Safeco Field but then the M’s haven’t played at Safeco as long as they did in the Kingdome.  IMO, they need speedy contact hitters who can get on base and know how to use the field.  Maybe the M’s should trade Brandon League to the Yankees?  I’ve love to see Cashman’s face if Jack called him with that offer after what happened with Pineda.

  • RadioGuy

    Had to happen.  Figgins not only hasn’t been making contact, we had a game end in Tampa Bay this week with him watching a called third strike…not exactly protecting the plate, which should be a strong point for a contact hitter (you’d think).  $9 million a year or no $9 million a year, he’s not doing what you need your guy at the top of the order to do and there’s no sense in making the kids keep sitting when they need the experience to prove whether they might be able to play at this level or not. 

    We ALL knew this would be a season of growing pains with so many young players on the roster and more on the way.  A consolation prize is that we’ve got good enough pitching right now to stay close within most games, and Walker, Paxton or Hultzen haven’t even reached AAA yet.

  • Artthiel

     He felt the money pressure the first year and never recovered. He’s not even making contact . Ackley’s not ideal, especially lately, but if Ryan is incapable, there’s no choice.

  • Jamo57

    Art, I kind of see Figgins’ issue the same way you do.   The money got in his head in a number of ways.    In addition though, now that PEDs are on the decline in MLB (at least I hope they are and not just better hidden) it seems to me the career arc of a ballplayer is moving back towards the norm through history.    Figgens is 34 now, which when I was growing up was normally getting late in the downhill side of a career.   Yes, the big contract was something he had trouble with at first but I really wonder if we just grossly overpaid for a player that had passed his prime when he signed the deal.   And the 4th year we had to add on the back end is really turning out to be the biggest mistake.