BY Art Thiel 05:44PM 04/27/2019

What the Seahawks’ 11 draftees look like

A whirlwind of trades increased the Seahawks’ draft harvest from four to 11. Here’s a look at each player’s video highlight reel.

Pete Carroll and John Schneider managed to load up in a draft they thought might pass by them. / Art Thiel, Sportspress Northwest

Improving from four draft picks Monday, fewest in the NFL, to 11 Saturday, second-most, was a monumental lift for the Seahawks. It even blew away Pete Carroll.

“I was hoping we’d get to six or seven, but we leap-frogged it,” he said Saturday afternoon after the third and final day of the NFL draft. “It really surpassed expectations I had for the week, to be like we are.

“I’m really thrilled. It puts us in a whole different framework. It’s going to be competitive, which is exactly the way we like it. It forces the energy and juice for camp. They did a great job.”

Whether it means an uptick or a regression from the 10-6 season in 2018 that was playoff worthy is largely why they play an NFL season. But at least they have much more from which to choose a roster.

The five trades made to re-stock the arsenal allowed the Seahawks to choose two defensive linemen, two linebackers, a safety, a cornerback, three wide receivers, a running back and a guard. They Seahawks also liked them some Pac-12 defenders: S Marquise Blair and LB Cody Barton from Utah, CB Ugo Amadi from Oregon and LB Ben Burr-Kirven from Washington.

Burr-Kervin was one of eight members of the Pac-12 Conference champion Washington Huskies to be selected: OL Kaleb McGary (first, Falcons), CB Byron Murphy (second, Cardinals), Taylor Rapp (second, Rams), TE Drew Sample (second, Bengals), DT Greg Gaines (fourth, Rams),  Jordan Miller (fifth, Falcons) and RB Myles Gaskin (seventh, Dolphins).

QB Jake Browning and FS JoJo McIntosh were undrafted. Browning reportedly will be signed as a free agent with Minnesota, and McIntosh reportedly will do the same with Washington.

Two Washington State Cougars were taken: OT Andre Dillard (first, Eagles) and QB Gardner Minshew (sixth, Jacksonville).

Here’s a quick look at the each of the Seahawk draftees:

First round

30: DE L.J. COLLIER, TEXAS CHRISTIAN

6-3, 283, redshirt senior

Seahawks potential role: Replacement for Frank Clark, traded to Kansas City, but better run stopper than pass rusher. Big for a rush end, but lots of aggression and great hands. Versatile like Michael Bennett.

Second round

37: S MARQUISE BLAIR, UTAH

6-2, 194, senior

Seahawks’ potential role: Perhaps the hardest hitter in the Seattle secondary since Kam Chancellor, Blair can back up both safeties and perhaps supplant FS Tedric Thompson. Downside is sometimes undisciplined play.

64: WR D.K. METCALF, MISSISSIPPI

6-3, 230, redshirt sophomore

Potential Seahawks role: The big receiver and deep-ball threat Carroll has long coveted, Metcalf is the freakiest athlete in the draft who has the most upside — and needs the most development time. He claims to love blocking.

Third round

88: LB CODY BARTON, UTAH

6-2, 237, senior

Potential Seahawks role: Physical and strong, Barton led Utes in tackles and will be depth behind K.J. Wright, insurance if Mychal Kendricks can’t play, and a special-teams dynamo.

Fourth round

120: WR GARY JENNINGS JR., W. VIRGINIA

6-1, 209, senior

Seahawks potential role: Possession/slot receiver. Pressure will be on him if Doug Baldwin doesn’t play. Tall, doesn’t get great separation early in routes. Ankle injury limited final season. Grew up in Richmond, Va., and went to Russell Wilson’s high school.

124: G PHIL HAYNES, WAKE FOREST

6-4, 305, senior

Seahawks potential role: Important depth should guards D.J. Fluker and Mike Iupati fail physically. A leader and physical mauler who could push Ethan Pocic out of a job. Lacks some fluidity and sometimes is slow off the snap.

132: CB UGOCHUKWU AMADI, OREGON

5-9, 199, senior

Seashawks potential role: Slot cornerback replacement for Justin Coleman, lost in free agency to Detroit. Leader, versatile. Short, and has slower acceleration.

FIFTH ROUND

142: LB BEN BURR-KERVIN, WASHINGTON

6-0, 222, senior

Potential Seahawks role: A first-team All-America who led the nation in tackles. BBK lacks NFL size. But speed, heart and smarts make him a long-term special teams weapon and speed blitzer.

Sixth round

204: RB TRAVIS HOMER, MIAMI

5-10, 200, junior

Seahawks potential role: Mike Davis’s departure in free agency created vacancy behind  Chris Carson and Rashaad Penny. Third-down back with good lateral agility but is fumble prone.

209: DT DEMARCUS CHRISTMAS, FLORIDA STATE

6-3, 292, redshirt senior

Potential Seahawks role: Depth in D-line, where Carroll can never have too many. Three-year starter and a run-stuffer, not a great athlete or pass rusher. Production fell off in 2018.

Seventh round

236: WR JOHN URSUA, HAWAII

5-9, 175 pounds, junior

Potential Seahawks role: Short, quick slot receiver for competition to succeed Baldwin, who also was knocked in 2011 draft for being too small. Led nation in receiving TDs (16). At 25 after LDS mission mostly in Paris, Ursua might be more ready than most.


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YourThoughts

  • Ron

    Makes sense, hand out the biggest contract in the league and fill out the roster with inexpensive rookies. Sounds like a winning formula for a title.

    • art thiel

      Let me know when you find an experienced rookie.

      • Ron

        Let me know when you can read the difference between inexpensive and inexperienced.

        • art thiel

          I’ve seen the light. Amen.

  • Alan Harrison

    A superb draft, lots of leaders, team captains, and people who seem to love the game of football. Ursua, given the sad circumstances with Doug Baldwin, might be this year’s steal.

    • art thiel

      The Seahawks have a way with late-rounders. John and Pete gushed about Ursua.

  • jafabian

    Schneider playing a numbers game. If half this draft class is contributing regularly this coming season or next then it will be a successful draft. Something that hasn’t been happening since the Super Bowl.

    • art thiel

      Fifty percent is standard around the NFL. The first three drafts of his tenure were higher, and there were also more open positions.