BY Art Thiel 06:00AM 02/11/2021

Thiel: There comes a time for many of the greats

Seahawks bosses reportedly “aren’t happy” Russell Wilson went public with his dissatisfaction. He’s hardly the first superstar to try to talk his way out of town.

Russell Wilson’s desires will be hard to meet in 2021. / Drew Sellers, Sportspress Northwest

Just for, um, fun.

Here’s a random sampling of pro-team superstars, and how long they lasted with their first major league team, followed by career length. Not saying there’s anything immediate happening in Seattle, but suddenly there’s a whole lotta WTFs in the air regarding a certain quarterback who has become the town gossip.

LeBron James — 7 seasons (21 total and counting)

Peyton Manning — 13 (17)

Kareem Abdul-Jabbar — 6 (20)

Shaquille O’Neal — 4 (20)

Bill Walton — 4 (10)

Roger Clemens — 13 (24)

Justin Verlander 13 (17 and counting)

Tom Brady — 20 (21 and counting)

Brett Favre — 16 (20)

Steve Young — 2 (13)

Charles Barkley — 8 (16)

Kevin Durant — 9 (13, and counting)

Allen Iverson — 12 (17)

Wayne Gretzky — 8 (20)

Alex Rodriguez — 7 (22)

Gary Payton — 13 (18)

Shawn Kemp — 8 (14)

Ken Griffey Jr. — 11 (22)

Babe Ruth — 6 (22)

Russell Wilson — 9 (??)

Baseball fans can go back many years to find most players spent their careers with a single team. But since baseball’s reserve clause was abolished in 1975, ushering the first real free agency, players in all sports have acquired much more leverage to move to another market for reasons of money, city, teammates, better chance to win and, perhaps, the opportunity to avoid Aaron Donald.

Even when under contract. There is no way fans like this sort of gamesmanship. Nor should they.

Nevertheless, if Seahawks fans enjoy having SS Jamal Adams, even though he bully-whined his way off the New York Jets, they have to accept the fact the Russell Wilson may attempt to bully-whine his way off the Seahawks. (Bully-whine is my new verb for players who seek something they don’t deserve, like influence over player selection — a bully; and have a legitimate complaint but look bad bringing it up, like poor pass protection — a whine).

Regarding Wilson’s bully-whine, it was given a big national boost Tuesday with his interview on Dan Patrick’s radio show. Wednesday, Patrick offered some commentary about it, including talking to an unidentified source who told him Seahawks management is “not happy” that Wilson aired his grievances publicly.

It’s really, really rare if he says anything in a negative way about anybody,” Patrick said.  “He’s been quiet for a decade. But I think that Russell wanted to create (with the interview) a sense of urgency, just like Aaron Rodgers did in Green Bay. He’s creating a sense of urgency — ‘take advantage of what you have with me right now.'”

I must disagree with Patrick. A sense of urgency was what the Seahawks had this season. And that’s why they’re in a bind regarding Wilson, and pissed he took it public.

The brutal flame-out in the playoffs’ first round against the Rams, particularly when Jared Freaking Goff — he of the recently broken thumb who came off the bench to complete nine passes, only to get run out of Los Angeles — led the victory, was devastating beyond a single loss.

The additions of Adams and DE Carlos Dunlap, and the return to health of nearly all the regulars, produced a 12-4 record and a championship in the NFL’s toughest division. With the Rams starting a rookie backup QB, coach Pete Carroll couldn’t have asked for much better, as he looked over an NFC that seemed to lack a dominant team.

Then a bad play call that was also poorly executed turned into a second-quarter pick-six, and the Seahawks never recovered.

Playing in a shoulder harness that meant he couldn’t raise his arms, Adams whiffed on two plays that turned into 44-yard gains, Wilson completed only two more passes than the breathtakingly mediocre Goff, and Football Hogwarts has since been in disarray.

By spending draft capital and free-agent money close to the max in order to go for it in Wilson’s age-32 season, and get zero playoff wins for it, the Seahawks are in trouble in a year when the salary cap shrinks $20 million.

Yes, the cutback is the same for all teams, but few of them have a $35 million QB and an $18 million linebacker like Bobby Wagner. And Wilson picked this moment to go public with his apparent unhappiness.

Patrick made another point.

“According to my source, if (Wilson’s agenda) doesn’t happen, then you wonder if this is going to be able to continue,” he said. “You wonder if Russ and the Seahawks are going to be able to coexist. If they don’t act on that, right now the current situation is not sustainable.

“That’s what I was told. Management’s not happy. Russ got their attention.”

On the point of coexistence, I agree with Patrick. Wilson is looking at a 10th season with a team that he may see as having peaked in 2020. Would he want to keep going?

To trade him now adds $39 million hit to their cap, but gets the Seahawks a max-premium return. To keep him requires some bridge-building and team-building that look more difficult with each passing interview.

It’s worth keeping in mind that Carroll and GM John Schneider each signed their own long-term extensions in 2020. And they’re the Type A personalities that would relish outdoing the people who traded Kareem, The Great One, the Kid and the King.

 


YourThoughts

  • Coop

    The time for true urgency in addressing the offensive line ‘issues’ was four years ago. Some saw this coming, and have been screaming about it since the George Fant experiment. I still haven’t forgiven the Seahawks for the Steve Hutchinson debacle. Feels like there was a lesson there that wasn’t learned.
    I’m proud of RW for voicing his frustration. About time. Finally some honesty. Local media could take a cue and stop with the hopeful “they’ll be okay” assessment.
    They’re not okay.
    Maybe RW admitting there is a problem will be the catalyst to real change. It won’t be easy to figure with the cap, but as someone said, “why not us?”

    • DB

      No disagreement, but but as with many problems, there seems to be a lack of willingness to look in the mirror. RW has been a contributor to the sacks total as much as the O-lines in that have been in front of him. ‘I need to help my O-line by getting rid of the ball quicker’ would have still focused on the issue, but would have gone over a lot better.

      • art thiel

        Wilson thinks that admitting he sometimes waits too long is a signal that he is unable to do something. And he declared himself to be Mr. Unlimited.

    • 1coolguy

      Hutchinson was gone with Minnesota before the Hawks realized it. What could the Hawks have done? Minnesota gave him a large offer at the time, and said “sign now or the deal is off”.

      • Coop

        The Seahawks didn’t re-sign him before he became a free agent, and didn’t put the franchise tag on him. The message to Hutch was clear, so he left.
        Seems like they signed some linebacker right after for the same money, who was traded in a few years.

        • art thiel

          There wasn’t a message to Hutch. It was a mistake.

      • art thiel

        The Seahawks did screw up. The front office didn’t follow Holmgren’s orders on Hutch.

        • 2nd place is 1st loser

          Just curious, I often hear of a so called “ poison pill” that was in Hutch’s contract. Was there such a thing, and what impact did it have. Other than one of the premier O-lineman leaving for Minnesota.

          • Alan Harrison

            There was – his Minnesota contract stated that he had to be the highest-paid offensive lineman on the team. That wouldn’t have been a problem with the Vikings, but the Hawks still had Walter Jones in his prime and given the choice, chose Walter. The horrible mistake was getting cutesy with the “transition tag” instead of just giving him the “franchise tag.”

          • 2nd place is 1st loser

            Thanks, the old penny wise and pound foolish tag.

          • art thiel

            Thanks for the accurate summary, Alan.

    • jafabian

      Sub-par O-Line play is consistent throughout the NFL. It isn’t unique with the Seahawks. NFL coaches have said players are entering the draft unprepared to be a pro O-Lineman. Despite that some teams find ways to win. Tom Brady is about as mobile as Dan Marino was in his twilight years. Same with Drew Brees. But they still get the job done. Wilson needs to emulate that.

      • art thiel

        You’re right about league wide O-line deficiencies. Bucs this year had a good one, but they were 7-5 before they figured it out.

    • art thiel

      The Seahawks have spent plenty of draft capital on OL. But only Britt got a second contract. The Seahawks’ premium dollars for extensions have gone to defenders, and to Wilson. Under a hard cap, every team has to make choices on priorities.

      I think playoffs in 9 of 11 seasons and a 12-4 division title this year is OK. But I could be wrong.

  • 2nd place is 1st loser

    The Hawks are in a pickle with having little draft capital and practically over budget on the cap. Jamal Adams contract will be a tough nut to crack considering he’s going to ask for the moon. The Hawks may have to trade him, might the Hawks be in a tough position because teams might realize that the Hawks are in a weak bargaining position and low ball them? With so many obstacles in the way and little pixie dust in Schneider’s bag of tricks how can things move forward without having to sacrifice something in personnel? Something has to give. Are we seeing the beginning of a slow spiral into mediocrity for the Hawks? #GoHawks.

    • Kevin Lynch

      Yep. The Adams contract situation is very sticky, given the likely amount, his injury and incumbent surgery, angry departure from the Jets, team cap, etc. I don’t know. The coming dump tomorrow night and Saturday might not be the only one in the cards. It just feels like when the music stops, someone with a big contract is not going to have a Seahawk chair to sit in.

    • 1coolguy

      Wagner and his $18mm will either be gone after this year or at a MUCH reduced contract.

    • Tman

      How different are Tom Brady and Russell Wilson? If Wilson goes, how long will it be before Tyler Lockett, DK Metcalf, Will Dissley and a healthy Jamal Adams
      join him?
      Wouldn’t it be easier to play with a real backfield with Wilson at QB, Chris Carson and Carlos Hyde at running/catching/blocking back with Penny backing them up? This would allow a pass first and run to catch them off guard, virtually unstoppable offense. Beats losing 5 of the best players in the game and beats Brady/Mahomes or Rogers in the super bowl next year

      • LarryLurex70

        You’re dreaming if you’re thinking there’s an NFL franchise located in this city that’s THIS close to a Super Bowl next season. I’m not sure how they accomplished 12-4 in 2020, but, as with the 49’ers and Rams recent SB appearances, I was never convinced it was going to be the way things were going to be going forward.

  • B-squared

    I totally agree that the O-line needs improving, but I swear I saw something in Russ’s eyes during the Rams game. He just didn’t look like he wanted to be there (IMO).
    Part of me thinks it’s a good time for a change of scenery on both sides. He looks like he wants to be a rockstar and we need a football player.

    • art thiel

      If you looked real closely into his eyes, you’d see Donald in his head.

      • jafabian

        Donald is for Wilson what Derrick Thomas was for Dave Krieg.

      • B-squared

        You’re right. When they show Donald pre-play pulling up on his pants belt and all you see is ginormous arms and a cold stare then I can see impending doom in your future.

  • Guy K. Browne

    Any team that has locked in 70% of their cap space over just 10 players is going to have a difficult time being competitive. The heyday of the Seahawks two consecutive Superbowl appearances were when Russ, Wagner, and Sherman were in the bargain portion of their early career restrictive contracts. There was a lot of money to throw at the role players that are necessary to, protect the quarterback, run block, and pass rush, with some additional money to throw at some superstars in key positions (Earl Thomas).
    The current model across the league is to throw crazy money at a franchise quarterback and try to cobble together a team around them.
    The reality is, modern quarterback contracts are the problem; so much of a teams resources are tied up in one position, the teams are handcuffed by these huge contracts. I don’t like Tom Brady any more than the next Seahawks fan, but he understood the calculus: You can win, or you can get paid. Over the long term, you can’t have both. He played for a long time at below market in New England and thus the team could keep the core together for winning.
    Patrick Mahomes situation in KC is looking strikingly familiar to the Seahawks of 8 years ago. Year 1, get accustomed to the NFL. Year 2 win the Superbowl. Year 3, lose the Superbowl. Year 4?… bet you a dollar to a doughnut that as KC has ascended, the other stars on the team will want to get paid too, KC will not be able to keep everyone and their decline into mediocrity will be inevitable.
    KC’s Superbowl should have looked strikingly familiar to Seahawks fans, a very highly paid franchise quarterback spending most of the game scrambling away from pressure, coming from every direction.

    • art thiel

      Good point about the KC/SEA parallels. But Mahomes has already gotten his first big deal, and his first deal was as a first-round pick. So his money will be a problem sooner than with Wilson. The QB pay inflation problem is true, and this year, because of the pandemic-induced cutbacks, will be worse.

      As far as Brady, rumor is NE provided him non-cash compensation, including use of facilities. Hard to to believe the Pats cheated, but . . . .

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  • Alan Harrison

    22 free agents in a year where the salary cap is shrinking. Yes, there can be lots of re-shuffling the deck chairs (converting salary to bonuses, extensions, cuts), but that doesn’t really address the line or the QB holding the football too long. Here’s hoping that the new OC (thanks, Russ, for the great opening week you just gave him…jeez) can find a way to get the ball out of his hands more quickly, beef up the OL somehow, even if it means we have to lose folks like KJ Wright, Tyler Lockett, and maybe even Bobby Wagner (year too early is better than a year too late, right?)

  • Bobby Cobb

    A few weeks ago I asked on this forum, “What are the odds the Seahawks trade Russ for a crap ton of draft picks?” and was more or less told I was on crack. At the time, I asked the question after reading Art’s column about Russ and Pete not being on the same page. But now it seems like the impossible is suddenly possible. For the record, I think it would be a huge gamble — and probably a bad one — but I’m sympathetic to the idea of rebuilding the team around a core philosophy instead of one expensive quarterback who is no longer as elusive as he once was but is still trying to work his playground-football magic.

    • 1coolguy

      For Darnold (presuming Waldron thinks he can be saved), the Hawks would get back the (2) # 1’s they gave up for Adams plus many more draft choices. They also would save $$$ on his contract, allowing them to pick up a few OL. Somehow get Wagner into a realistic deal and that $18mm can get spread out, etc, and the Hawks would suddenly be in good shape.
      Darnold has (1) more year left and given his poor first 3 years, cannot command big dollars in a new contract. Getting out of NY, like Adams, for the Hawks would be seen by him as a new lease on life.
      Can the Hawks move RW? Doesn’t he have an NTC?
      It’s all conjecture, but isn’t it fun?

      “Sam Darnold signed a 4 year, $30,247,715 contract with the New York Jets, including a $20,078,338 signing bonus, $30,247,715 guaranteed, and an average annual salary of $7,561,929. In 2021, Darnold will earn a base salary of $920,000 and a roster bonus of $3,854,685, while carrying a cap hit of $9,794,271 and a dead cap value of $9,794,271.”

      • Bobby Cobb

        Intriguing and terrifying all at once! Trade RW and his massive salary for draft picks and a 23-year-old “bust” who might benefit from different coaching and/or some new scenery. I read that article and started thinking how lucky we are to have a top-flight QB. At least with Russ, we can complain about how the Seahawks fared in the playoffs… ;)

        • Husky73

          With Sam Darnold at quarterback, the Seahawks would go from 12-4 to 3-13. The folks in this room would be jumping into the volcano.

          • Bobby Cobb

            The Lou Piniella Mariners and the George Karl Sonics were often criticized for not winning titles, but after both coaches left, Seattle learned what true misery looks like.

          • art thiel

            Circumstances are vastly different in each, but your general point about quality leadership is true.

          • jafabian

            The Sonics later had a solid coach in Nate McMillan and the M’s in Bob Melvin. But both got chased away. You know the old saying, misery loves company.

          • Husky73

            Piniella won 3 division titles and a wild card. Karl won 4 division titles and a conference championship.

          • LarryLurex70

            Nice, but, ultimately, not really, if the league championship is the goal. Division “titles” and the banners that accompany them are a poor substitute for the real prize, and are almost an indication of a franchise (not just the ‘Hawks & M’s) so championship-starved that they’re desperate enough to place that level of importance on them.
            Kind of like celebrating being good… but not good enough.

          • art thiel

            I’m guessing there might be more coming the Seahawks way than a straight up swap.

        • art thiel

          That is always the point. Wilson has some legit criticisms, but he’s going to have to throttle back the best-ever legacy stuff.

      • art thiel

        Among flawed but serviceable younger QBs, I’d prefer Derek Carr. But yes, Darnold is cheap.

        • 1coolguy

          I agree and would pick up Carr also, yet a Darnold trade would come with a butt-load of draft choices

          • art thiel

            I’m fairly certain Wilson would use his no-trade to avoid NYJ, and any number of draft picks down the road won’t help 2021.

    • art thiel

      The option is before the house now. I think what changed from a league perspective is Goff-Stafford and the cap shrinkage. A $35M QB is really burdensome, so the risk-reward calculus has shifted. The cap hit after a trade is onerous, but not necessarily murderous in that nearly all teams are going to have to release quality veterans into free agency.

    • Mark Stratton

      Why not trade for Deshaun Watson? The Texans can be had, that’s been proven. I know they don’t have a ton of draft picks. Maybe a three-team deal?

      • LarryLurex70

        I’d be surprised if they move him. No matter how much he doesn’t want to be there. He’s still a guy they can try to repair the relationship with and build around. With Wilson, they’d be in win-now mode…without the necessary pieces. Would be a strictly stat-padding move for Wilson on his way to a Gold blazer.

        • art thiel

          True. The Texans are in a huge tear-down with Watson the biggest franchise asset. I don’t see trading him.

      • 1coolguy

        @ $45mm I’d be surprised if anyone picks him up. That’s more than 25% of the cap! The Texans were fools and still are

  • Will Ganschow

    Will Ganschow • 3 days ago
    Tom Brady has been successful because in order for him to win it has been necessary to provide him adequate pass protection. He has never been a scrambler. he has been hit so much less and is playing championship football at age 43. Mahomes like Wilson provides the illusion that you can win with less protection because each can to one degree or another scramble. Even though in Wilson’s case he has never missed a game, he is already less a scramble, more a take a hit/sack guy as the game takes its toll on him, as I believe you are starting to see with Mahomes. Seahawks should consider offers for Wilson while he is at peak value. Go ahead, hate me. It’s just a game.

    art thiel SportspressNW Will Ganschow • 3 days ago
    There is a small case for your argument. But as with nearly all lawyers in America regarding defending Trump, I politely decline to take your case.

    • Ed Walsh

      Good points by everyone . Would like to repeat, however, that Mr. Wilson completed all games, mostly uninjured, despite ridiculous pounding. 9 seasons. Most of his way more celebrated year one peers went the way of the horse-drawn Civil War ambulance, losing not game participation, but seasons and careers. ((RG III, Andrew Luck, etc, and oh by the way the young QB currently with the Texans. Russ did that with hard physical work and clever play , while doing all that other great stuff. Can’t see a smart play in letting him go—he is literally the Seahawks best option, 20 ways from [Sunday], to have a super quality guy standing at season’s end. Schneider and Carroll will figure it out. But that’s just me. The first requirement of a great player is to play, once he is great.

  • Husky73

    “Comes a time, when you’re driftin’. Comes a time, when you settle down. Comes a light, feelin’s liftin’…..comes a time.” (Neil Young). Perhaps Russell’s time has come.

    • Bruce McDermott

      …lift that baby right up off the ground….

      • art thiel

        I defer to your liner notes.

    • coug73

      Let it go, let it go
      Can’t hold it back anymore
      Let it go, let it go
      Turn away and slam the door
      I don’t care what they’re going to say
      Let the storm rage on
      The cold never bothered me anyway
      Frozen

    • LarryLurex70

      Or, maybe at this point, Russ is just playing “for the turnstiles”.

  • DB

    When I saw the article title I thought we might be getting a Martyball retrospective. We lost a great coach and better man on Monday. When Brian came on board with the Seahawks, I had to believe Pete was thinking he had a guy who understood the balance a power run game brings to an offense. Apparently, that wasn’t the case.

    Bully-Whine is a terrific addition to the Thiel lexicon, and a perfect descriptor for the curious public bleating from our superstar QB. So out of character, and, other than pissing off management and his O-line, to what practical end?

    • art thiel

      Since he’s under contract and isn’t pursuing more money, Wilson is using the leverage accorded great QBs to make Carroll publicly accountable for responding to Wilson’s desires. If he fails to get satisfied, Carroll will be set up to be the villain should Wilson be traded.

  • Tman

    If the players union worked for the players instead of the owners, there would be no salary cap. Since the cap is in place, there are two moves that will work to bring financial fairness to the players.
    1. Eliminate the cap.
    2. Cap the owners income and split excess profits equally between players and owners.

    The cap is a negative. LaMoney should not force the Seahawks, or any team, to move star players

    • 1coolguy

      Then why be an owner? You would do very well in Russia, loyal comrade

      • Tman

        OK. I’ll Bite. What does the owner bring to the table but money? Why let owners make all they want but tell players they can’t get fair market value?
        How does the Green Bay Public Ownership work? Is Green Bays the way i it should be? How did we end up with just the opposite? Is the Green Bay way some kind of Commie Deal?

        • Husky73

          Ancient history….as a wheezing last gasp effort to keep the Pilots in Seattle, a “Green Bay ownership model” was proposed. MLB laughed.

          • Tman

            How have the mariners done with private ownership that sells its star players for revenue instead of building winning teams. How many Mariners can you name today?

        • art thiel

          GB is a publicly owned company run by a board with a president, an arrangement grandfathered in from the 1920s that will never be allowed in pro sports again. Playing fair happens only when it is forced upon capitalists by collective bargaining.

          • Tman

            Begging the question, “Do the owners pay the union heads to get what they want or do the players”?
            It also begs the question, “Why don’t the players sit things out until the salary cap goes away”?

            When it comes to ownership, It is true, when the PA announcer says, “and now, YOUR Green Bay Packers”, but untrue when the PA Announcer says, “and now YOUR Seattle Seahawks”. For it to be true, and nothing against Ms. Allen, the PA announcer will say, “and now, Jodi Allens’ Seattle Seahawks”.

            Isn’t it true the city of Seattle should own the franchise and the team? If this were the case for all pro sports, the Sonics would still be playing at the Key Arena and Ken Behrings’ midnight flight would never have happened. Just because Robert Kraft, and 30 other billionaires, like the system doesn’t make it right.
            Is it possible, with public ownership, the city might set aside some seats so a few low income parents and kids might get the pleasure of attending a game in person?

            It is a thrill to see Russell Wilson, DK Metcalf,Tyler Lockett, Coach Carroll and all the Seahawks in person. As it is now, many Seattle citizens cannot afford the price of Cable to see them on TV.

    • art thiel

      Capping ownership revs is an all-time non-starter.

    • Archangelo Spumoni

      The football players’ union is weak partially because of sca*s like Steve Largent. Check out how the last strike went and especially look at the high priced guys who crossed. Largent had the least to gain by playing but he bleeped the rest of his teammates for more than a generation.
      Compare the football players’ union to baseball, please. Note the great Marvin Miller’s leadership and NONE of the players crossed. Especially noteworthy considering how many were from the South.
      Finally, football careers are so short that a long strike exceeds many careers.

  • jafabian

    The shortcomings of the O-Line during the Pete Carroll era has been well documented. In fact the only time in Seahawks history it really wasn’t a big issue was during the Jones/Hutchinson/Tobeck era and the Hawks don’t have a Lombardi to show for it. In fact some of the best offensive lines I’ve seen play were the Bills Electric Company of the 70’s, the Boomer Essiason Bengals during their SB run and the Warren Moon Oilers. None have any Lombardi’s but they at least have some HOFers. A team can at least get to the SB with just a “good” line.

    If a team can field a Pro Bowl O-Line that’s great but they also need a solid defense that can put the offense on the field. If Wilson knows his line is inconsistent then why does he continue to wait for his receivers to get open? He should be running through his checkpoints and then either taking off or throwing the ball away. It’s been reported that this has been addressed with him but it continues to be as much of an issue as the shortcomings of the line. The Hawks give Wilson 35 million reasons every year to work with them and when he airs grievances to the national media as well has inconsistent play when it counts and even cost the organization $100,000 when he blew off concussion protocol on national TV I can’t help but wonder what Deshaun Watson would look like in Seahawk blue. Along with a first and third round draft pick and enough cap room to go after a good lineman.

  • 3 Lions

    If it’s “urgent” in Russell’s mind he should restructure his deal. As mentioned, Touchdown Tommy (Super Bowl Tommy?) took below market rate for years. I don’t doubt he might have a lifetime contract to endorse Gillette razors but it’s near impossible to build a championship caliber roster with a couple guys consuming the majority of the cap.
    I wouldn’t put it past Carroll & Schneider to blow it up if they got the “right” offer. They both have time on their contracts & love the scouting, drafting & coaching process. As it appears now, the division is getting even more competitive and we have limited picks this year(as of now) and free agent challenges.

    • art thiel

      I’m sure Wilson would allow some part of his base to be converted to a signing bonus, which helps 2021, but kicks the can down the road. But by 2022 Wilson’s dead money hit drops to $26M.

      • Ed Walsh

        Exactly, Art.

  • Mark Stratton

    I’ll bet Urban Meyer would rather have Russ than Trevor Lawrence. First overall pick plus a few others for Russ would certainly fix a lot of the Seahawks flexibility problems.

    • LarryLurex70

      That’s a swap that benefits Seattle far more than Jacksonville. Plus, Meyer would be receiving a starting QB that he can’t tell what to do. He can do that to Lawrence.

      • Husky73

        A 69 year old head coach is not going to start over with a rookie QB.

        • LarryLurex70

          I’m not the one who proposed the swap, and, I wasn’t looking at it from the SeaSquawks perspective anyway.

    • 1coolguy

      He wouldn’t make it out his front door alive

  • DJ

    Thanks Art – I see this only as Russell seizing the moment in the aftermath of the Man of the Year – which IS THE REASON WHY he’s been interviewed – covering all of his bases to assure that EVERYTHING POSSIBLE is being done to correct the ills of the offense.

    He’s been such a good soldier, forever, protecting the franchise, that I don’t see him divulging anything that hasn’t already been openly talked about between him, Pete and John – without revealing their private conversations. There are too many positives with Russell to ever consider him not remaining the cornerstone until he retires.

    The Seahawks are a different kind of ship than other current and past sports franchises, and they are smart not to let a great thing get away. I’m sure the Seahawks are going to continue to do what they can to enhance Russell’s well being, which will be a byproduct of a new offense. It will continue to be an interesting off season, and I’m looking forward to next season! Go Hawks!